WHO

WHO'S COMING DOWN YOUR CHIMNEY TONIGHT?




Charles Stross, "Overtime"

2016: CTHULHU FOR CHRISTMAS

Sunday, April 30, 2017

Review: Cry Little Sister

Cry Little Sister Cry Little Sister by Nick Younker
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Review of CRY, LITTLE SISTER
by Nick Younker

Quite a different approach to the subject of vampirisim, an almost scientific approach. This is the sad and troubled story of a young woman, lovely in form and soul, a flower who grew despite the ravages of existence. Her spirited beauty shines like a beacon which attracts a jaded vampire. He plans to bestow the “dark kiss” and make her his lifelong companion, but that just doesn't work out as expected, although poetic justice is served.

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Friday, April 28, 2017

Review: The Third Twin

The Third Twin The Third Twin by Darren Speegle
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Review of THE THIRD TWIN
by Darren Speegle

THE THIRD TWIN is a massively metaphysical novel which so stretched out my imagination I'm certain it will never shrink to its previous size. In this story line, time and space and those ordinary dimensions we think of as the physics of nature, as components of consensus reality, really aren't applicable. It is fortunate for the protagonist, extreme sport enthusiast and traveloguer Barry Ocason, and for the reader, that Barry is as open-minded, as willing to explore reality and meta-reality, as he is, for an “ordinary” individual would never be able to even begin to investigate the occurrences in which he and his surviving twin daughter find themselves, let alone be effective in unraveling the rationale.

THE THIRD TWIN is not a read-in-one-session, flip-through, or skim, novel. You have to put effort into it, you have to utilize your brain, and you must be open-minded and open-hearted. In no way is Darren Speegle's writing derivative, yet I was at points reminded both of Ira Levin's terrifying THE BOYS FROM BRAZIL, and of some of the weirder works of Richard Laymon, as well as 19th century works of meta-philosopy.

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Thursday, April 27, 2017

Review: Devil's Island

Devil's Island Devil's Island by Mark Lukens
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Review of DEVIL'S ISLAND by Mark Lukens

DEVIL'S ISLAND is a delightfully scary book with lots of hauntings and terrors beyond hauntings. A small Caribbean island, deserted for a century, is the focus of first a corporate attempt to remodel the mansion into a resort, and second, of a billionaire filmmaker who allegedly wishes to film a documentary. But the Thornhill Manor is no ordinary abandoned residence, and the island is no ordinary island. Nicknamed “Devil's Island” by natives in the 19th century, after a brief period of residence by the Thornhills, the island harbors a force of prehistory, powerful and compelling.

The filmmaker, Nick Gorman, hires a motley crew of psychics and scientists to investigate Thornhill Manor over a 48-hour-period. What they encounter seems tailor-made to their particular fears, a factor which renders the story even more terrifying for the various characters and for the readers as well.

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Wednesday, April 26, 2017

Review: Feast

Feast Feast by Thomas S. Flowers
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Review of FEAST
by Thomas S. Flowers

Whenever I open a story by Thomas S. Flowers, I don't know what theme, character, or plot to expect (the man's imagination is wide-ranging), but I do expect that the story, whatever it is, will be deep—and wide; rather like a river than a tiny crick. I also know that, like a river, deep within will be soil and grit and mud; personal and family secrets; and horrors unexpected. So too is FEAST, Mr. Flowers' latest, which commences with a bang (quite literally), unexpected and unplanned violence, and then delves really deep into the river of human unconsciousness. These individuals and families might be from a tiny patch in rural Texas, but their currents run very, very deep.

FEAST is subtitled “an extreme horror story,” which is factual; but I don't think it goes far enough. FEAST is dark, dark, dark. Just when you think, “can this situation turn any worse? Can these folks do anything more evil than what has already been accomplished?”, you learn that yes, it can be worse, and yes, it can be more evil. Oh, my; what folks won't do in the service of greed, not just for money, not just for flesh, but for fear of the unknown and fear of the “different,” out of misguided empathy, shame, guilt, and vengeance. There is much reflection here of classical Greek drama. Those Greek playwrights really understood how to reveal twisted human psyches. So does Thomas S. Flowers.

I expect I will have nightmares for quite some time. What a story!

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Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Review: The Weird Company: The Secret History of H.P. Lovecraft's Twentieth Century

The Weird Company: The Secret History of H.P. Lovecraft's Twentieth Century The Weird Company: The Secret History of H.P. Lovecraft's Twentieth Century by Pete Rawlik
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Review of THE WEIRD COMPANY
by Pete Rawlik

THE WEIRD COMPANY (title becomes apparent during the story) is a very literate, well-crafted homage to H. P. Lovecraft and an excellent addition to the ever-expanding Lovecraft Mythos. HPL's aficionados will well recognize references as events throughout the story play both on the reader's mental stage and on the cosmic backdrop itself. Commencing with a 1931 Miskatonic University expedition to the vast frozen reaches of the Antarctic, continuing with the Federal Occupation of Innsmouth, Massachusetts, and on again to Antarctica, this horror/mystery/supernatural thriller weaves in many events, participants, and places from Lovecraft's own seminal work. Author Pete Rawlik seamless interweaves these multiple anecdotes and keeps readers' attention throughout, leaving us with the impetus to reread again the master himself: H. P. Lovecraft.

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Saturday, April 22, 2017

Review: Rites of Azathoth

Rites of Azathoth Rites of Azathoth by Frank Cavallo
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Review of THE RITES OF AZATHOTH
by Frank Cavallo

THE RITES OF AZATHOTH is an exceptional and outstanding horror/mystery/thriller which can proudly take its place in the Lovecraftian Mythos as a fine work of fiction. Riveting, intriguing, and terrifying, the novel speeds us along as an FBI profiler, highly intelligent but morally ambiguous, agrees to field work after a lapse of several years. The case to which her Assistant Director assigns her is one so strange and farfetched that no one in law enforcement can comprehend or encapsulate it. A confessed killer of the mid-1970's has bee incarcerated for forty years. The man is blind. He disappears from his cell in the Federal Penitentiary in Ohio. He kills without leaving traces, and without touching the victim. He insists all he does is “at the command of Azathoth.” Arrayed in opposition to him are not only local law enforcement and the FBI, but also a highly organized, highly powerful, very wealthy secret group, The Disciples of the Black Fame. They are awaiting the Convergence, a date “when the stars are right,” to summon Yog-Sothoth to open the gate and allow the return of the extra-dimensional Outer Gods.

If this summary sounds Lovecraftian, it does so for good reason. I have to think that HPL himself would approve! Certainly I find this novel utterly delightful—and very terrifying.

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Monday, April 17, 2017

Review: Northern Frights: An Anthology by the Horror Writers of Maine

Northern Frights: An Anthology by the Horror Writers of Maine Northern Frights: An Anthology by the Horror Writers of Maine by David Price
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

REVIEW OF NORTHERN LIGHTS:
AN ANTHOLOGY BY THE HORROR WRITERS OF MAINE

NORTHERN LIGHTS is an exceptional collection of horror, set in Maine, by Maine authors. I've always longed to live in Maine's cold reaches and snowy isolation. But as these stories represent, isolation has its problems, and so does winter, neighbors, ghosts, and birds you don't ever want to encounter. What is so exciting about this Maine horror anthology is the particular settings, which remind me of Lovecraft's Mythos in that Nature, and Nature's entitities, are above, beyond, and devoid of any concern for humanity. (In fact, the story “Agony Chamber” is amazing in its display of the nihilism of the elder gods of divergent pantheons.)

All in all, a horror aficionado can't go wrong selecting the NORTHERN FRIGHTS Anthology!

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Saturday, April 15, 2017

Review: We Came Back

We Came Back We Came Back by Patrick Lacey
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Review of WE CAME BACK
by Patrick Lacey

When I discovered this novel, my first thought was to remember reading the author's wonderful DREAM WOODS, and thinking “oh, this is going to be scary.” Then the title triggered a remembrance of Stephen King's “Sometimes They Come Back,” and I upgraded that perception to “seriously scary.” Author Patrick Lacey not only fulfilled those expectations admirably; he delivers a story with tremendous emotional impact, peeling his characters right down to their cores. This is true not just for the good guys: ex-boyfriend Justin, father Frank, mother of two boys Mrs. Brown. It's also true for the bad guys, and those who had been good guys till they invested in the dark side. (That term is intentional.)

Mr. Lacey's stated intent is to honor the memory of his late father, and indeed, all proceeds go to a cancer charity. He certainly fulfills that intent as well, writing in depth of a father who passed from cancer and the consequences for his adolescent son and his widow. He also examines so clearly the psyche of a father who has lost a young son. By turns terrifying, heartwrenching, and even heartwarming, WE CAME BACK goes far beyond “simple” scary horror into the realms of the human spirit, manipulation of minds and spirits, emotional depths. I know I'll be coming back to reread this soon.

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Thursday, April 13, 2017

Review: 10 Short Horror Stories Vol:1

10 Short Horror Stories Vol:1 10 Short Horror Stories Vol:1 by Steven Havelock
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Review of 10 SHORT HORROR STORIES

This is the first in a series. The stories are very short, and express a variety of different types of horror

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Review: The End

The End The End by Justine Avery
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Review of THE END

A twisted and convoluted haunted mystery novella, the denouement began in a manner I had expected, but quickly diverged into a new channel all its own. I appreciate the character evolution. An almost middle-aged corporate drone, soon to be a first-time father, product of a horrendous upbringing, has only one pleasure: the solitude of mountain biking in the canyons. When his GoPro videos a prediction, Trevor knows he must change predestination--or die trying.

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Wednesday, April 12, 2017

Review: Horror Library, Volume 6

Horror Library, Volume 6 Horror Library, Volume 6 by Bentley Little
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Review of HORROR LIBRARY VOL. 6
Edited by Eric J. Guignard

The HORROR LIBRARY ongoing anthology has a well-deserved repute for literate horror penned by talented authors. This volume ranges from first publication of an author, through not yet well known talent, to horror household names, satiating a wide interest range while simultaneously inspiring a desire to explore these authors further. 27 stories are accompanied by an illuminating introduction from the new editor, whetting readers' horror-loving appetites.

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Review: Horror Library, Volume 6

Horror Library, Volume 6 Horror Library, Volume 6 by Bentley Little
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Review of HORROR LIBRARY VOL. 6
Edited by Eric S. Guignard

The HORROR LIBRARY ongoing anthology has a well-deserved repute for literate horror penned by talented authors. This volume ranges from first publication of an author, through not yet well known talent, to horror household names, satiating a wide interest range while simultaneously inspiring a desire to explore these authors further. 27 stories are accompanied by an illuminating introduction from the new editor, whetting readers' horror-loving appetites.


View all my reviews

Review: Horror Library, Volume 6

Horror Library, Volume 6 Horror Library, Volume 6 by Bentley Little
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Review of HORROR LIBRARY VOL. 6
Edited by Eric S. Guignard

The HORROR LIBRARY ongoing anthology has a well-deserved repute for literate horror penned by talented authors. This volume ranges from first publication of an author, through not yet well known talent, to horror household names, satiating a wide interest range while simultaneously inspiring a desire to explore these authors further. 27 stories are accompanied by an illuminating introduction from the new editor, whetting readers' horror-loving appetites.


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Sunday, April 9, 2017

Review: Black Pantheons: Collected Tales of Gnostic Dread

Black Pantheons: Collected Tales of Gnostic Dread Black Pantheons: Collected Tales of Gnostic Dread by Curtis M. Lawson
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Review of BLACK PANTHEONS by Curtis M. Lawson

Present in this collection is a veritable feast for the discerning aficionado of dark fiction. Sometimes Lovecraftian, other times Qabalistic, yet at other turns relying on myth, legend, and Hebrew dark magic, BLACK PANTHEONS is literate and intellectual horror as it really ought to be written. I so appreciated how each entry tugged at my soul and stretched the bounds of my imagination. These are not stories you sit down to flip through during commercials; these are tales meant to be savoured, pondered, thoroughly and creatively considered. I'm inspired to look up more from this very gifted author, whose creativity finds its playground in the spaces between the stars.

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SPRING INTO HORROR READATHON--April 17-30

Forge ahead into Spring with a full-out Horror binge. A creation of SEASONS OF READING. Sign up here: http://seasonsreading.blogspot.com/2017/04/signup-for-spring-into-horror-readathon.html

SPRING INTO HORROR READATHON begins today. As this is my lifetime favourite genre, reading Horror is not a problem. (smile) I'll be continuing my "every-evening-Laymon-reading" which I commmenced about three weeks ago. I am working my way through the oeuvre of late horror meister Richard Laymon, literally every evening. I read review titles days, Laymon at night.

I want to recommend an anthology I can't include in this Readathon, since I read it April 14-16.
It's NORTHERN FRIGHTS: AN ANTHOLOGY OF THE HORROR WRITERS OF MAINE, a truly outstanding collection of spine-tingling, hair-raising, horror set in Maine, by Maine authors.releassed April 11, 2017. See my review here. http://thehauntedreadingroom.blogspot.com/2017/04/review-northern-frights-anthology-by.html

Day 1, April 17:

Read: OCTOBER RUNS RED by Scott Donnelly

Reading:

666 CHARING CROSS ROAD by Paul Magrs (print)

MONSTERS IN OUR WAKE by J.H. Moncrief

NIGHT IN THE LONESOME OCTOBER by Richard Laymon

Day 2, April 18:

Read: NIGHT IN THE LONESOME OCTOBER by Richard Laymon

Day 3, April 19: Read: 666 CHARING CROSS ROAD by Paul Magrs

Reading: Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury

Resurrection Dreams by Richard Laymon

Day 4, April 20: my youngest grandson turned 2, his younger sibling will be born any day now, and that will be 8 grandchildren here. Read: RESURRECTION DREAMS by Richard Laymon

Reading: THE INVERTED PYRAMID by A. C. Fuller, ARC to be released April 26

Day 5, April 21:

Read: THE INVERTED PYRAMID BY A. C. Fuller, release date April 23

Reading: THE RITES OF AZATHOTH by Frank Cavallo, an exceptional Lovecraftian Mythos horror/mystery/thriller I absolutely love! Already released, but I received a review copy through Netalley just today.

Day 6, April 22 (Earth Day):

Read: THE RITES OF AZATHOTH by Frank Cavallo

Day 7, April 23: Read: ARC, ANIMAL GRAPH by M. Black (ANIMAL GRAPH Series #1)

Reading: ARC, THE THIRD TWIN by Darren Speegle

THE WEIRD COMPANY by Pete Rawlins (1936 Antarctica, Lovecraftian)

Day 8, April 24:

Read: THE THIRD TWIN by Darren Speegle (ARC, release date April 28)

THE WEIRD COMPANY by Pete Rawlik (Lovecraft Mythos)

Reading: DEVIL'S ISLAND by Mark Lukens (horror, haunting)

Day 9, April 25:

Read: TINY TROPHIES by Adam Hughes (horror short story)

DEVIL'S ISLAND by Mark Lukens

Day 10, April 26:DROWNI

Read: FEAST by Thomas S. Flowers

THE NOTE by Andrew Barrett

Day 11, April 27:

HEALING by Josephine Green (review) MEDIUMSHIP by Tabitha Zalot (review)

Day 12 and 13, Apil 28 and 29:

quite a 2-day period: my 10th grandchild (6th grandson was born on April 28, my oldest grandson turned 14 on April 29)

3 in 1 Thriller Boxset by Kristoff Chimes, including

ROGUE ANGEL

WEB OF ANGELS

DROWNING IN RAINBOWS

April 29: read: THE IMMORTAL BODY by William Holloway (Lovecraftian)

Saturday, April 8, 2017

Review: The Lake

The Lake The Lake by Richard Laymon
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Review of THE LAKE by Richard Laymon

The more I read by this master of horror and suspense, the more I find to marvel at concerning his deep understanding of the psychology of the aberrant. His human “monsters” are so evil that the supernatural or paranormal isn't needed. In THE LAKE, as in DARKNESS, TELL US and the BEAST HOUSE series, human greed, selfishness, and abnormal psychology reaches horrendous extremes. But author Laymon understood so well this type of psychology that the reader is not wondering “Is that possible?” but instead hoping we ourselves never encounter such.

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Friday, April 7, 2017

Review: Paperbacks from Hell: A History of Horror Fiction from the '70s and '80s

Paperbacks from Hell: A History of Horror Fiction from the '70s and '80s Paperbacks from Hell: A History of Horror Fiction from the '70s and '80s by Grady Hendrix
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Review of PAPERBACK FROM HELL by Grady Hendrix

Horror nostalgia rocks in author Grady Hendrix' exceptional and thoroughly entertaining recounting of two of horror publishing's most fervent decades, the 1970's through 1980's. Mr. Hendrix clearly loves and knows his topic, and for readers who also have reveled in novels produced in this period, memories will awaken. Perhaps among readers who don't know these books, inspiration might arise to search out some of these novels. Mr. Hendrix offers clarity, humour, and the benefit of a thorough understanding of horror publishing's most prolific hour.

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Thursday, April 6, 2017

Review: Jackals

Jackals Jackals by Stuart R Brogan
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Review of JACKALS by Stuart R. Brogan

JACKALS begins with explosive violence and never lets up. A small four-person group of killers assaults a local police station, then an innocent couple returning from an anniversary dinner. Their choices are not particularly random, and certainly their rationale is not: these killing teams, known as Jackals, are in service to “the Order,” a secretive cabal of highly-placed, powerful, wealthy individuals who, quite frankly, intend to rule the world (or at least the UK). Taking Darwin's Theory of Evolution to an extreme (or perhaps to a divergence), the Order foresees mankind's devolution into animalism. In the meantime, they're going to speed the process, and train their killing teams to practice extreme violence, and to believe they are sending their victims to “the Void,” and by doing so evolving themselves. All that matters is “The Primitive,” and that is what is missing from contemporary humanity.

The team focused on, which attacked the police station and the dining couple, find they may have taken on more than they expected, as some of those they consider “carrion” actually fight back. Throughout the novel it's heart-in-throat with the ups and downs, constant danger, and thrill-a-minute revelations right through to the very end.

"The Heathen In the Modern Age" by Stuart R. Brogan (author ofJACKALS)--Guest Post

The Heathen in the Modern Age

 

Some people have asked me, how can the Vikings and northern hemisphere religious and spiritual belief system have any bearing in today’s modern world. Some might even think that to hold such beliefs constitutes a lack of understanding, and represents advocating slightly backward thinking for those not wanting to embrace today’s technology,or worse, give the impression that we are living in a utopian dream worlddevoid of reality. For me though, and a growing number of people, the answer is far from crazy. We are, in factof the opinion that our ancestors social and spiritual guide lines are needed now more than ever before and thankfully we are no longer on the side lines looking in, but are making our voices heard, ironically, through the technology readily available to ustoday.

When I wrote Heathen Warrior, there were the distant rumblings and murmurings of a reawakening regarding the ancestral belief system of Northern Europe. Obviously, mine wasn’t the only voice stating as much,and certainly wasn’t the last, but until then, the majority of the general public presumed that to hold such regional specific values, was nothing more than racially divisive and that it was all about hate rather than heritage and inclusivity. Thankfully, we are now in the position that a growing number now understand that stating we are Heathen represents more than just the hijacking of our faith and symbols by the far right and its advocates and that the vast majority of Heathens are in fact, decent,hardworking, and socially balanced members of society.

Is it any coincidence that this new wave of tolerance coincides with the rise in popularity of TV shows like Vikings or the period fantasy showGame of Thrones? Or could they have had a profound effect on the collective conscious? Have they tapped into the viewers need for technological devolution, harking and craving for a simpler time when life was deemed to be better?

Of course, to say the late “Dark Age” was better, is na├»ve and rather simplistic and despite our best efforts we will never truly know what it was like to live in such an age, but maybe it’s the yearning for the freedom to be self-sufficient and not having to rely on technology. In fact,I believe it is man’s true nature to want to live as simple as possible, to be of need rather than greed. Of course, such shows have the dramatic and romantic element to them, some would think themselves mightywarriors, or for that matter, beautiful princess’s, but the reality is that they have stirred something within us, and when we are on the tube or in our car on the way to work, battling through hordes of people, our minds wonder back and imagine that things were different.

Heathen Warrior explored this ethos and transposed the workings of it to modern life, be it physically, spiritually, or socially. In every context, it has attributes that can enhance and enrich. It isn’t about being the Alpha male full of muscles, able to defeat every other living human, but about having the fortitude and focus to achieve one’s goals even when we are at our lowest ebb. To have the courage of our convictions and to be able touse the inner strength that we may not have known existed.

Of course, I received a little back lash from the “purists” who deemed it boarding on Wicca (a less confrontational path of Paganism) but to mistake mine, and others form of tolerance as weakness would be a mistake, for unlike most, our faith demands that we not take the stance of retreat, rather for us to stand tall for our convictions.

To illustrate my point, in my shop we sell a t-shirt with the slogan “Heathen – Paganism with Attitude” and it has been a huge seller, the amount of people that it resonates with has been astronomical. This, in itself, is justification that general attitudes towards the faith are changing and as I stated in my book our belief structure has to adapt to the modern world or fear losing it to the mists of time, but doesn’t that contradict the notion of devolution?

As with every paradox we must be realistic in our reasoning. Yes, it is true that our faith has to move with the times for fear of stagnation but we must also listen to our inner calling regarding a simpler life, free from the pressures and social dogma of the modern world. The Heathen Warrior rationale is that we must be pragmatic and aware of our surroundings yet strive to be as self-sufficient as possible.

I am not for one second suggesting that we should all quit our jobs and run away and live in a cabin in the woods (although the idea is somewhat tempting) but rather, make little changes with regards to our everyday lives that may assist us in living the life we truly desire. How this resonates with you, the reader, is a personal choice, like everything within the Heathen faith, we advocate personal responsibility and make our own decisions, even when others around us are pressurising us to conform.

My own personal path towards being a Heathen began when I was a child, although I did not know it at the time. All my life I held the ideals close to my heart, but never knew it had a name nor did I know anyone else thought the same. In truth, I was never a “Religious” person and today I feel the same way. For me being Heathen is a philosophy, a way of life. I honour my God’s and Goddesses in my day to day actions rather than set aside one special day to “show” how devout I am, in my opinion it doesn’t work like that.

It wasn’t until the early 2000’s that I had my “eureka” moment, a sense of coming home when all became clear. What exactly happened is a private affair but suffice to say it truly was an awakening that I remember vividly. I have spoken to a lot of Heathens over the years and they all have said the same thing, it felt like coming home and that they had always felt like it but were unable to label it. To me, this is fantastic and goes to show that there are more and more people out there finding and exploring the benefits of Heathenry.

In my shop, I have had the pleasure of meeting a vast array of Heathen folk, some of whom have become friends, some of which enjoy my book and a few who didn’t agree with it, and I am happy with that. Being individual means not following the herd, just because I say something doesn’t make it correct, especially if it doesn’t “feel” right to you. And that’s the beauty of it; we can be Heathen yet disagree on things and still remain amicable.

All in all, personal responsibility, self-awareness and the willingness to evolve and grow as humans are the cornerstones of the Heathen faith. Some may scream that this is common sense and that I am telling you how to suck eggs, but let’s be honest, as we look around in the modern world, we can’t help but notice that common sense appears to be in short supply these days.



Stuart R Brogan is a former nightclub bouncer and unwaveringly proud Heathen who loves nothing more than expanding people’s minds with Pagan related Non-Fiction or blowing people’s brains out with fast paced, gut wrenching, thrilling horrors.

Harley lover, extreme metal drummer and avid movie nerd, Stuart has never followed the crowd but instead carved his own path and danced to his own tune. Since his early years, Stuart found escapism in both the written word and the silver screen. A huge fan of 80’s Action / Horror movies such as The ThingAliensPredator & Die Hard and literary heroes such as Shaun Hutson, Clive Barker, Richard Layman and Brian Lumley, Stuart endeavours to bring an unapologetic cinematic eye to his fiction in the hopes of rekindling his childhood sense of wonder, all whilst blowing through vast amounts of ammunition down his local shooting range.

Stuart currently resides in Glastonbury, UK with his long-suffering wife and man eating Shih-Poo dog “Poppy” where he co-owns a kick ass Viking / Asatru shop, fiercely named “Shield Maiden”

 


Wednesday, April 5, 2017

THE BOUNDARY MONSTER by Jeremy Hepler_Review






The Boulevard Monster
by Jeremy Hepler
Bloodshot Books
Pub date: April 7, 2017

A debut novel you won’t want to miss!

The Boulevard Monster, Synopsis –

I KNOW WHAT YOU HAVE HEARD ABOUT ME

You say that I am a madman. You say that I am dangerous. You say that I am the one who has been abducting women, slaughtering them, and burying their corpses all around this city for years. You are wrong, because only part of that statement is true…

I AM NOT A KILLER

I know that you probably won’t believe me. Not now. Not after all that has happened, but I need to tell my side of the story. You need to know how this all began. You need to hear about the birds, but most of all, you need to understand…

I AM NOT THE BOULEVARD MONSTER

Purchase –

Amazon

And it’s available at other online retailers too. Plus, ask your indie bookstore to order for you or tell your local library about it!

Jeremy Hepler, Biography -

Native to the Texas Panhandle, Jeremy Hepler now lives in a small rural community in central Texas with his wife Tricia and son Noah. Throughout his life, he has worked jobs ranging from welder's hand to health care assistant, but writing has always been his passion.

Jeremy is a member of the Horror Writer's Association (HWA) and is currently working on his second novel, Demigod Dreams. In the last five years, he has had twenty-four short stories published in various small and professional markets, and in 2014, he placed second in the Panhandle Professional Writers Short Story Competition. You can contact him via Facebook or Twitter (@jeremyhepler) where you will find links to his blog and Amazon author page.

Want to Feature?

If you’re a book blogger or media site and would like to feature Jeremy Hepler or review The Boulevard Monster, contact Erin Al-Mehairi, publicist, at hookofabook@hotmail.com.













Review of THE BOULEVARD MONSTER by Jeremy Hepler I totally enjoyed reading this well-constructed and intriguing horror novel. I loved that the horror element was implacable, both the seemingly impossible but very factual “otherworldly” incursion, and also the real-life “inescapability”: law enforcement following irrefutable evidence; marital distrust; and so forth. Protagonist Seth is the proverbial “good guy,” imperfect but loving, loyal, and dedicated. Until he falls headfirst into a situation where “doing the right thing” puts him in the target of something unexplainable but implacable and deadly. I see myself rereading this (I raced through it in a few hours) and hope for more soon from this talented author.

Review: The Boulevard Monster

The Boulevard Monster The Boulevard Monster by Jeremy Hepler
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Release April 7

Review of THE BOULEVARD MONSTER by Jeremy Hepler

I totally enjoyed reading this well-constructed and intriguing horror novel. I loved that the horror element was implacable, both the seemingly impossible but very factual “otherworldly” incursion, and also the real-life “inescapability”: law enforcement following irrefutable evidence; marital distrust; and so forth. Protagonist Seth is the proverbial “good guy,” imperfect but loving, loyal, and dedicated. Until he falls headfirst into a situation where “doing the right thing” puts him in the target of something unexplainable but implacable and deadly. I see myself rereading this (I raced through it in a few hours) and hope for more soon from this talented author.

View all my reviews