WHO

WHO'S COMING DOWN YOUR CHIMNEY TONIGHT?




Charles Stross, "Overtime"

2016: CTHULHU FOR CHRISTMAS

Friday, March 31, 2017

Review: Embers: A Collection of Dark Fiction

Embers: A Collection of Dark Fiction Embers: A Collection of Dark Fiction by Kenneth W. Cain
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Review of EMBERS by Kenneth W. Cain

A sterling single-author collection, EMBERS is the third short story collection by prolific author Kenneth W. Cain. For readers who haven't encountered Mr. Cain, here is a wonderful introduction. Prepare for the stretching of your mind and the expansion of your imagination as Kenneth W. Cain boldly goes into unexplored territory, sometimes speculative, other times horrific, but always enlightening. My recommendation is sample one story at a time, taking time to savor the enjoyment or to reel from the horror; then let the story sink in.

View all my reviews

Review: Dark Designs: Tales of Mad Science

Dark Designs: Tales of Mad Science Dark Designs: Tales of Mad Science by Thomas S. Flowers
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Review of DARK DESIGNS

I cannot highly enough rave about the DARK DESIGNS Anthology, edited by Thomas S. Flowers and Duncan Ralston (both of whom also contributed stories), and comprising 15 exceptional stories. I have my personal specific favorites, of course, based on my own preferred horror flavours, but each entry is exciting, intriguing, and yes, horrifying. I love science, and off-the-track science as presented here is, well, mind-boggling. (smile)

All proceeds from this outstanding anthology go to “Medicin San Frontiers” (Doctors Without Borders).

View all my reviews

Thursday, March 30, 2017

Review: Sole Connection: A Short Story

Sole Connection: A Short Story Sole Connection: A Short Story by William Oday
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Review of SOLE CONNECTION by William Oday

This short story is wonderful in itself: heartwrenching, heartwarming, and so realistic in terms of today's society. It is also a prequel to MANEATER, and introduces some of the characters, but why not enjoy it just for itself? I don't think too many readers will fail to be strongly affected by it, as author William Oday makes us fall in love with his characters, rejoice and mourn with them. Even in the short story form, they are fully realized characters and quite endearing.

View all my reviews

Review: Darkness, Tell Us

Darkness, Tell Us Darkness, Tell Us by Richard Laymon
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Review of DARKNESS, TELL US
by Richard Laymon

Where do I start to rave over this novel? My heart stayed in my throat the entire time, and no distractions could sway me from my reading. Laymon takes characters who on the surface seem to be ordinary: one college professor, six of her students—and what he construct from this simple stew is an amazing terror, joy, love, hope, human persistence, narrative. Drop all the “camping in the wilderness” horror tropes, because what Richard Laymon introduces readers to is metahorror: above, below, and way beyond cliched inbred backwoodsman or escaped criminals. He juggles several villains along with a few “good guys” (of both genders, and some fairly ordinary (greedy, self-centered) humans. One of the good characters states later on that usually these villainous types are found in urban environments, not out in the wilderness; and he hadn't even encountered some of them.

This novel is dark, dark, dark, in almost every sense of that definition; yet it is incredibly powerful and compelling, with empowered characters who forge on—literally no matter what danger. I loved it.

View all my reviews

Friday, March 24, 2017

Review: Mj-12: Inception: A Majestic-12 Thriller

Mj-12: Inception: A Majestic-12 Thriller Mj-12: Inception: A Majestic-12 Thriller by Michael J. Martinez
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Review: MJ-12: INCEPTION
by Michael Martinez

I am so excited that MJ-12: INCEPTION is the first in a new series by author Michael Martinez. This novel is totally engrossing, and will appeal to any readers who love science fiction, history, conspiracy theories, espionage thrillers, and riveting writing with well-delineated characters and heart-in-mouth suspense. Back in 1945, at the U.S. Atomic bombing of Hiroshima, Japan, an anomaly was “created,” directly below the atmosphere point at which the bomb exploded. Meanwhile, Nazi scientists predicted such, and secured subterranean chambers under the former Reich Chancellery in Berlin (even though that portion of Berlin was by then under Soviet control). They also managed to create conditions to which a similar anomaly appeared. As the years roll forward, the U.S. “captures” the Hiroshima anomaly and installs it at Groom Lake in Nevada: Area 51. The Soviets transfer theirs to a neuropsychological institute in Leningrad. Both sides battle for supremacy in understanding and utilitizing individuals who have been tracked, targeted, and changed by the anomalies: “Variants.” Many in both governments fear the Variants' divergent superpowers, and many others see them as future superweapons. Very few except Lieutenant Commander Daniel Wallace any longer recognise them as humans.

View all my reviews

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Review: The Knowing

The Knowing The Knowing by David Graham
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Review of THE KNOWING by David Graham

A direct sequel to author Graham's terrifying thriller, THE SCREAMING, this novel can nevertheless stand on its own, as sufficient backstory is drawn in throughout so those who may not have read THE SCREAMING can still thrill to the chills and scares of THE KNOWING, as well as enjoying the author's subtle humour and tugging of heartstrings among the characters.

After EM radiation from cell phones and the Internet had been proven to cause adolescent psychosis, the UK banned mobile phones and Internet access, while the US shoveled all adolescents into protective care (read, asylums) under executive order. The silencing of electromagnetic radiation throughout the UK has allowed an influx of “other” energies, including witchcraft, which is on a steep rise. Kansas City, Missouri, police sergeants Dale Franklin and Steve Abrams, who had been instrumental in helping identify the causes of the adolescent psychosis crisis in the U.S., travel to London and discover a new conspiracy, one which reaches to MI5 and possibly to the Queen.

View all my reviews

Sunday, March 19, 2017

Review: Highwayman

Highwayman Highwayman by Craig Saunders
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Review of HIGHWAYMAN by Craig Saunders

HIGHWAYMAN is truly a wild ride, only to expected from author Craig Saunders. We are quickly introduced to a pair of soul-stealers, masquerading as a long-together elderly couple. These two nasties show up at the scenes of “unexpected” death: individuals who are at the brink of death, but possibly recoverable. This couple is not there to soothe the dying, offer medical assistance, or comfort the bereaved. They are present solely to steal the life light; the woman takes from dying females, the man from dying males. These are “highwaymen,” and one man, Karl Goodman, has witnessed their abrupt appearance, behaviour, and equally abrupt disappearance too many times. Now he himself is trapped in a void, “the Land Between Midnight,” and he is determined to avenge the loss of his daughter one year ago, taken by these entities.

View all my reviews

Review: Highwayman

Highwayman Highwayman by Craig Saunders
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Review of HIGHWAYMAN by Craig Saunders

HIGHWAYMAN is truly a wild ride, only to expected from author Craig Saunders. We are quickly introduced to a pair of soul-stealers, masquerading as a long-together elderly couple. These two nasties show up at the scenes of “unexpected” death: individuals who are at the brink of death, but possibly recoverable. This couple is not there to soothe the dying, offer medical assistance, or comfort the bereaved. They are present solely to steal the life light; the woman takes from dying females, the man from dying males. These are “highwaymen,” and one man, Karl Goodman, has witnessed their abrupt appearance, behaviour, and equally abrupt disappearance too many times. Now he himself is trapped in a void, “the Land Between Midnight,” and he is determined to avenge the loss of his daughter one year ago, taken by these entities.

View all my reviews

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Review: Demon With a Comb-Over

Demon With a Comb-Over Demon With a Comb-Over by Stuart R. West
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Review of DEMON WITH A COMB-OVER by Stuart R. West

This is a sprightly and hilarious, yet sad, novel. High recommendation from a reader who doesn't do humour: I frequently chuckled, smiled wryly, and yes, even laughed out loud! Charlie Broadmoor is a feckless comedian-by-choice, product of middle-class parents, poor, divorced, with 50-50 custody of daughter Serena, and an aggravating, spacy, ex-wife Celia. Charlie really wishes his comedy career would rocket, but instead of lots of laughs and profitable gigs, Charlie picks on an audience member one night and gets way more than he bargained for. Charlie mocks the man's comb-over, only to discover, this isn't a man, he isn't human: he's the demon Kobal, formerly demon of mockery; and Kobal is infuriated. He's sending Charlie straight to hell, but first he's detouring through Charlie's life, pestering (and deleting) his neighbors, friends, and family!

View all my reviews

Review: Fred & Rose

Fred & Rose Fred & Rose by Howard Sounes
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Review of FRED & ROSE by Howard Sounes

A couple of weeks ago, prisoner-for-life Rose West was assaulted by another female inmate, who later stated that as a mother herself she could not tolerate Rose's crimes, nor the attention and approbation she believes Rose receives. So I found it apropos that this superb recounting of the killer couple, Fred West and Rose Leets West, their crimes and personalities, history and ancestry, be published this week (March 14, 2017 release). The author, Howard Sounes, is a journalist and biographer, who actually “broke” some of the news surrounding the discoveries in February-March 1994 of the numerous, even extensive, killings committed by one or both of this evil pair. Yes, I use the term “evil,” because I think any lesser disapprobation applies. Fred and Rose, singularly and coupled, acted far beyond the accepted bounds of human behaviour. Indeed, for these two, no taboos existed. What they desired, they acted upon, no matter how horrendous. Like two infants, they insisted on immediate gratification; they had no code of moral conduct, indeed no morality whatsoever; and their planning extended only to disposing of victims in order to leave no witnesses. Of course, if they had thought in advance, and had not responded to their every passing whim, many young women would not have died agonizingly.

FRED & ROSE is a difficult read for a human who has any emotions or empathy, but it is superbly written and very revealing of how, why, where, and what of the crimes committed by this couple (individually and in concert). It is not reading for the faint of heart; but for readers like myself, who are impelled to read true crime and crime fiction to learn “Why? How could such have happened? Who could act this way?” it's essential reading, offering also the questions “Where were the authorities (law enforcement, medical, social services) when these victims—young adults, adolescents, and children—fell prey to these two “human” monsters?

View all my reviews

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Review: Touch Sensitive

Touch Sensitive Touch Sensitive by Lee Isserow
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Review: TOUCH SENSITIVE by Lee Isserow

A noir-ish paranormal featuring an unusual Liverpool private investigator with an unusual capacity: he is a sensitive, specifically tactilely. That is, while other sensitivities experience memories through visual, olfactory, auditory, or gustatory input, he receives through touch. I think it may be common to wistfully wonder what others think of us, or what may have occurred in a particular locale, but to be open to this flood of input, constantly, must be terrifying. Following his investigations is eye-opening, and elicits reader's empathy for this individual who desires to be tough and hard-boiled, but remains soft and vulnerable.

View all my reviews

Monday, March 13, 2017

Review: Death by Pumpkin: The Rhe Brewster Mysteries

Death by Pumpkin: The Rhe Brewster Mysteries Death by Pumpkin: The Rhe Brewster Mysteries by N.A. Granger
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Review of DEATH BY PUMPKIN
by N. Granger

An entertaining and highly intriguing Maine cozy, DEATH BY PUMPKIN is third in a series. Imaginative in premise, this mystery begins with a bang and strongly hooks the reader, and enwraps us with the characters and storyline. Rhe Brewster is an ER nurse, mother of an ADHD son, widow, and sister-in-law of the police chief of her community. She is also a part-time police consultant. The author warmly endears the characters, as murder rears its very ugly head (even though it's performed creatively), and emotions run high (and for some, even higher). DEATH BY PUMPKIN is a mystery delineating the adage “Keep your friends close, and your enemies even closer.” I'll definitely be looking to review other mysteries in the Rhe Brewster series.

View all my reviews

Sunday, March 12, 2017

Review: Clown Moon

Clown Moon Clown Moon by Alex Jameson
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Review of CLOWN MOON by Alex Jameson

This engrossing horror/thriller is set in the “clown craze” of 2016, connecting it to a former clown era in 1981, 35 years earlier. But the craze of 2016 is terrifying, offering violence on both sides, injuries, even fatalities. Clowns and “clown hunters” both are aggressive and dangerous. It's a call for criminals, lowlifes, pedophiles, rapists, and killers to come out to play, and soon it seems as if no one and nowhere can remain safe.

Sam Asher, a former Marine sniper, and his brother Jake, a police officer in Kingston, North Carolina, are drawn into the fray when their nephew Aiden, a high school student, is brutally murdered in the woods one night while wearing a clown costume reworked to appear scary, even terrifying. Sam determines to find the killer, even as more murders of “clowns” occur in divergent locales.

CLOWN MOON is a heart-in-mouth page-turner, rendered more horrifying because the events related here actually could happen, anywhere. Even if the explanation is mob hysteria, history shows how easily and often that occurs. I recommend CLOWN MOON!

View all my reviews

Wednesday, March 8, 2017

Review: Legacy Mausoleums

Legacy Mausoleums Legacy Mausoleums by Nick Younker
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

LEGACY MAUSOLEUMS
by Nick Younker

Freelance web journalist Duncan Criss is seeking a second job, one that will pay his shelter bills while he continues his online site reporting “weird news.” Lucking into a job as overnight security at the Legacy Mausoleum in his area, Duncan thinks he has it made. However, the expression “changed his life” is about to become literally true for this young man.

View all my reviews

Review: The Birth of an American Demon

The Birth of an American Demon The Birth of an American Demon by Nick Younker
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

BIRTH OF AN AMERICAN DEMON
by Nick Younker

Quite a scary novella, BIRTH OF AN AMERICAN DEMON relates the involuntary release of a demon trapped in the form of a Shawnee warrior from a millenia ago, occurring outside of a tiny little Southern Indiana community. Until this unexpected event, Lucy, Indiana was quiet, peaceful, and scenic. But tales were related about a Shawnee warrior battling a demonic curse—tales told but not really heeded. Until two feckless hunters release....

View all my reviews

Monday, March 6, 2017

Review: Unseemly

Unseemly Unseemly by Jason Parent
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Review: UNSEEMLY by Jason Parent

This novelette is just exceptional. I certainly did not expect it to unfold as it did, neither the denouement nor the conclusion. The poetic imagery throughout really inspires vividness, and there's a neat balance of "I really don't trust/shouldn't get involved" vs. sheer greed plus inertia. The outworking of the plot is deliciously scary. Definitely rereadable.

View all my reviews

Sunday, March 5, 2017

Review: Keep in a Cold, Dark Place

Keep in a Cold, Dark Place Keep in a Cold, Dark Place by Michael F. Stewart
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Review: KEEP IN A COLD, DARK PLACE by Michael F. Stewart

Fascinating, delightful, inspiring, yet supremely sad and subtly scary: KEEP IN A COLD, DARK PLACE is all of this and more. The story of a poorly-thriving, hardscratch existence of a potato-farming family, living just outside of a tiny town which itself can barely stay alive, this setting so reminded me of the Great Depression, and of the Dust Bowl so capably elucidated by author John Steinbeck. Yet this is contemporary, so it seems somehow worse.

Thirteen-year-old Limphetta ("Limpy") can never satisfy her rough Irish immigrant father nor her older brothers. Her mother died during Limpy' s birth, and so all the housework devolves to her, in addition to much of the farm work, and schooling. She just wants to create art, and to be loved. When she "coincidentally" unearths an antique box entombed under the barn' s cellar, Limpy, like Pandora, unleashes evil with good intentions. Maybe there is a real reason their farm has always been considered "cursed."

View all my reviews

Saturday, March 4, 2017

FULL WOLF MOON by Lincoln Child_Review

Full Wolf MoonFull Wolf Moon by Lincoln Child
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Review of FULL WOLF MOON by Lincoln Child

Suspension of disbelief provides strong tension throughout as our protagonist himself struggles with his intent to maintain an open mind. Dr. Jeremy Logan, Yale Professor of History, is by avocation (and a growing reputation), an "enigmalogist,' an individual who studies and investigates odd phenomena without an apparent cause. For example, Dr. Logan has investigated "Nessie," Scotland's Loch Ness Monster.

When the novel commences, he is ensconcing himself for a six-week retreat at Cloudland in the scenic, densely-forested Adirondacks if upstate New York. He has scarcely arrived when a visitor appears, a former friend from his undergraduate days, a philosopher who is also a Forest Ranger. He requests Dr. Logan, who is also a sensitive--an empath who perceives emotions and energy, both from humans and locations--to look into a series of deaths-by-mauling, each occurring in the Desolation Mountain wilderness, each during a full moon. Possible causes are bear or wolf, but the evidence is erratic. Investigators are certain the killer could not be human, due to the strength required for the degree of violence. Locals blame a reclusive clan living deep in the forest since the early 18th century, or earlier, who are believed to be both werewolves, and ritual child murders. Author Lincoln Child keeps the suspense boiling and delivers an unexpected denouement which leaves protagonist and reader reeling.

View all my reviews

BURNTOWN by Jennifer McMahon_Review

BurntownBurntown by Jennifer McMahon
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Review: BURNTOWN by Jennifer McMahon

A twisted and convoluted tale which winds in on itself much like a pretzel, BURNTOWN is the story of three generations of a family who might be considered "cursed." A grandfather who acquired plans for Thomas Edison's final design, a device which might well change the world. A father who spends his workdays and off times in appliance repair. A mother with movie star aura who spends a lot of time gone from home. A son who inadvertently witnesses his mother's demise. A personal myth which propels his life, his wife's, and his daughter's. A mysterious stalker called "Snake Eyes" who is not only persistent to a fault and dangerous, but is also a serial killer.

Author Jennifer McMahon illustrates her characters in such depth, to the bare bones and beyond, and she also delineates Place: An economically-depressed city, lost and nearly forgotten; and its underside, the habitat of the homeless, of the upper middle class whose greed and lust for life propels use of controlled substances and a descent into crime. Always in the shadows is the manipulative mastermind nicknamed "Snake Eyes."

View all my reviews

Friday, March 3, 2017

Review: Neighborhood Watch

Neighborhood Watch Neighborhood Watch by Andrew Neiderman
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Review of NEIGHBORHOOD WATCH by Andrew Neiderman

Just this week I've read two excellent books with this title, the first being NEIGHBORHOOD WATCH by Stuart R. West. However, the horror/thriller I had in mind while reading Andrew Neiderman's NEIGHBORHOOD WATCH was THE ASSOCIATION by Bentley Little, which I read some years ago. Both focus on gated communities, overseen (and ordered) by a narcissistic leader and his minions. In the Little novel, there was much emphasis on brutality and horror. Mr. Neiderman's novel does contain violence, but the story as a whole relies on psychological horror rather than “gore for gore's sake.” I think Andrew Neiderman's novels are noted for their psychological emphasis, and here it carries the story as he examines the psychological underpinnings of a large number of characters. In some ways it was rather like reading both a psychological treatise and a sociological study, but neither aspect detracted at all from my total enjoyment of and absorption in the story.

View all my reviews

Review: Beatrice Beecham's Cryptic Crypt

Beatrice Beecham's Cryptic Crypt Beatrice Beecham's Cryptic Crypt by Dave Jeffery
My rating: 0 of 5 stars

Review of BEATRICE BEECHAM' S CRYPTIC CRYPT


I love this series! It's well-written, absorbing, serious but by turns humorous, and in the tradition of good fiction, BEATRICE BEECHAM' S CRYPTIC CRYPT also brings powerful impact beyond its import to the characters.

Young Beatrice Beecham is a relative newcomer to the tiny coastal fishing village of Dorsal Finn, but in her tenure she has made several fast friendships in a group called the Newshounds. These young people are intelligent and loyal to a fault, compassionate and respectful to elders. They also thrive on solving mysteries and embrace the paranormal. In BEATRICE BEECHAM' S CRYPTIC CRYPT, World War II events reawaken, and the Newshounds are drawn into a massive covert plot to create a neo-Nazi dystopia, concealed as a children's club to instill purpose in misguided young lives.

View all my reviews

Thursday, March 2, 2017

Review: The Hobbsburg Horror

The Hobbsburg Horror The Hobbsburg Horror by Thomas S. Flowers
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Review: THE HOBBSBURG HORROR by Thomas S. Flowers

A reader approaches any writing of Thomas S. Flowers expecting to return deeply affected. I first became aware of this while reading his novels, and this is also true of his newly-released short story collection, THE HOBBSBURG HORROR. Mr. Flowers has a deep appreciation of both history, and of the human condition, along its rather vast continuum. His horror I categorize as "literate horror," as it rises above simple splatter for splatter' s sake. Each story subtly burrows into the reader's mind and roots there, refusing to be dislodged. I find myself trying to find comparisons, unsuccessfully, because Thomas S. Flowers maintains a class all his own.


View all my reviews

Wednesday, March 1, 2017

Review: We Are Always Watching

We Are Always Watching We Are Always Watching by Hunter Shea
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Review: WE ARE ALWAYS WATCHING by Hunter Shea

Hunter Shea' s reputation for locking on to a wide range of horror potentials is spot on. Whatever particular avenue crosses his imagination, is delivered to readers with talent and finesse. WE ARE ALWAYS WATCHING is one scary novella, and ought to be enjoyed outside in broad daylight. This is not the lately routine stalking-serial killer novel; instead this story focuses on the Guardians, an invisible, inaudible, omnipresent entity or entities, which are ubiquitous and omniscient. Outdoors, indoors, "They" watch, wait, and warn. Possibly they are simply Observers; possibly they are killers. Possibly.

The treasure of this story, apart from the SCARY, is West Ridley. Fourteen years old and wise beyond his years, West loves the horror genre in all its aspects and his life purpose is to become a paranormal investigator. Far from being a one-dimensional hormone-driven early-adolescent, West' s character is deep. Hunter Shea explicates West from inside out, and I readily cheered for the boy, because even though there are other "good guys," (for example, West' s mother Debi, and his late grandmother), West is "the man." Reminded me of Holden Caulfield. So I can call WE ARE ALWAYS WATCHING a terrifying, wonderful, deep, coming-of-age horror.

We Are Always Watching, Synopsis
Print Length: 252 pages Publisher: Sinister Grin Press Publication Date: March 1, 2017

They’ve watched over the house for generations… The move from New York to the decrepit Pennsylvania farmhouse is as bad as West Ridley thought it would be. His father’s crippling vertigo only seems to get worse, and even with his mother working herself to the bone, they’re out of money and options. Grandpa Abraham is a drunk bastard and the living embodiment of the long neglected farmhouse. He claims the place is haunted. Ghosts roam the hall at night and their muffled cries fill the silence of warm, summer nights. On the ceiling above West’s bed are the words WE SEE YOU. In a house plagued by death and mysterious visitations, West realizes something beyond the fiction of his favorite horror books has to be faced. Dark secrets are buried deep, and there are Guardians who want to keep it that way. No matter where they go or what they do, West and his family know one thing… they are always watching. Hunter Shea, Biography Hunter Shea is the product of a misspent childhood watching scary movies, reading forbidden books and wishing Bigfoot would walk past his house. He doesn’t just write about the paranormal – he actively seeks out the things that scare the hell out of people and experiences them for himself. Hunter’s novels can even be found on display at the International Cryptozoology Museum. His video podcast, Monster Men, is one of the most watched horror podcasts in the world. He’s a bestselling author of frightful tales such as The Montauk Monster, They Rise, Island of the Forbidden, Tortures of the Damned, The Jersey Devil, and many more, all of them written with the express desire to quicken heartbeats and make spines tingle. Living with his wonderful family and two cats, he’s happy to be close enough to New York City to gobble down Gray’s Papaya hotdogs when the craving hits.

You can follow Hunter and join his action packed Dark Hunter Newsletter at www.huntershea.com.

Praise for Hunter Shea “Hunter Shea is a great writer, highly entertaining, and definitely in the upper echelon in the current horror scene. Many other writers mention either loving his work and/or having the man influence their own, and for just cause. His writing suits anyone with a taste for the dark and terrifying!” –Zakk at The Eyes of Madness “Hunter Shea has his own style. It’s simple, yet well-written, stories that flow with ease. Mr. Shea graciously walks you through the adventure and mystery, all the while, tickling the hairs on the nape of your neck and filling the pit of your guts with lead. It’s this “I’m your friend who just might make you wanna sleep with the lights on” relationship the author builds with us that keeps us comfortable, but not too comfortable, and on our toes throughout his work. I find that an extremely admirable ability.” –Glenn Rolfe, Author of Chasing Ghosts and The Haunted Halls Purchase Amazon Want to Feature? If you’re a book blogger or media site and would like to feature Hunter Shea or review We Are Always Watching, contact Erin Al-Mehairi, publicist, at hookofabook@hotmail.com.